The Isle of Cipit

By Nancy Brooks

Action & adventure, Paranormal | Paperback, eBook


Deep within a jungle canopy, gnarled fingers brush aside the broad leaves of a ceiba tree. Cavernous eyes watch as captives are forced to dig for buried treasure. Men armed with weapons stand guard, their human stench wafting towards the darkening sky. Anticipation tightens the wrinkles on its ancient face, and an eerie child-like giggle escapes. Researching legends of supernatural creatures in El Salvador was the perfect way for anthropology student Maggie De La Torre and her friends to spend the summer; the highlight of her trip is an old candy vendor’s story of a flesh-eating goblin that resembles the mischievous imp, El Cipitillo. Falling in love at first sight with a tall blond stranger is an added bonus, despite her initial reserve about having a summer fling. Everything about Kiarme attracts her, captures her, and possesses her entire being, until he kills a crew of fishermen and threatens her friends’ lives. Maggie soon realizes that the creature she’s forced to help him hunt is the same one that terrorized the candy vendor decades before—but it’s even more bloodthirsty than the old woman had warned. Everything was going according to plan; captive miners were extracting the last of the buried treasure, the next phase of their mission was about to commence, and the future was beginning to seem brighter. In one single moment, all hell breaks loose: adrenaline pumps through his veins in torrents as screams of a dozen terrified men propel a mercenary commander onto a dangerous path in a desperate attempt to maintain control. Fueled by the near-fatal incident, unsettled by a confrontation with a creature neither animal nor human, Kiarme is determined to eliminate the threat by any means necessary—even kidnapping American students who may have crucial information. Knowing he’ll have to kill Maggie to keep the island and mercenary plans secret, he struggles between loyalty to his men and his ardent need for the beautiful woman who has suddenly stolen his heart.


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Deep within a jungle canopy, gnarled fingers brush aside the broad leaves of a ceiba tree. Cavernous eyes watch as captives are forced to dig for buried treasure. Men armed with weapons stand guard, their human stench wafting towards the darkening sky. Anticipation tightens the wrinkles on its ancient face, and an eerie child-like giggle escapes. Researching legends of supernatural creatures in El Salvador was the perfect way for anthropology student Maggie De La Torre and her friends to spend the summer; the highlight of her trip is an old candy vendor’s story of a flesh-eating goblin that resembles the mischievous imp, El Cipitillo. Falling in love at first sight with a tall blond stranger is an added bonus, despite her initial reserve about having a summer fling. Everything about Kia...


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I was born and raised in San Francisco, work in downtown Stockton, and live in Lodi, California. I'm a First-Generation American with many cultural backgrounds, including ancestors from El Salvador, Lebanon, Canada, England, and Ireland - countries rich in folklore and legendary creatures. As a child, my imagination soared whenever Salvadorean relatives retold stories of elves, witches, demons and curses. I was fascinated with the tales, and enjoyed retelling them to my friends, always finding it amazing that no one else had heard of these fantastical creatures; not only that, but hardly anyone from my generation knew the lore from their own ancestors' native lands. After years of research and comparison, I've found striking similarities in the legends and folktales of many diverse cultures, and am now dedicated to planting seeds of probability in my readers' minds: Are folktales merely stories to entertain, or were they based on actual accounts and events? Did anyone actually SEE El Cipitillo? Did people actually run into La Ziguanaba if they were out too late at night? Why do so many cultures have stories of dwarf-like creatures - El Duende from various Latin American countries, the nuno sa punso from the Philippines, leprechauns from Ireland? Could there have been a race of 'little people' who migrated all over the world? Why do so many cultures have stories of succubi and mares - women who are beautiful seductresses one moment and horrible hags the next? My goal is to create interest in ancient legends from around the world. Folklore and culture are fading with each generation, regardless of our ancestors’ native land. Whether our individual heritage originated in Latin America, Africa, Asia or the Middle East, we are losing the wonders of oral tradition. These are stories that may have once been real events, history with an entertaining twist, and we’re losing them. I want to bring these legends to life, in a modern setting, and awaken mainstream interest in them. Why do so many countries on every continent have such similar creatures in their tales? Could they have really existed once upon a time? Are we really that different from each other if we've all had the same nightmares? The same fantasies?


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I was born and raised in San Francisco, work in downtown Stockton, and live in Lodi, California. I'm a First-Generation American with many cultural backgrounds, including ancestors from El Salvador, Lebanon, Canada, England, and Ireland - countries rich in folklore and legendary creatures. As a child, my imagination soared whenever Salvadorean relatives retold stories of elves, witches, demons...


More...



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